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I read several dozen stories a year from miserable, lonely guys who insist that women won’t come near them despite the fact that they are just the nicest guys in the world.

..I’m asking what do you offer? Are you smart? Funny? Interesting? Talented? Ambitious? Creative? OK, now what do you do to demonstrate those attributes to the world? Don’t say that you’re a nice guy — that’s the bare minimum.

“Well, I’m not sexist or racist or greedy or shallow or abusive! Not like those other douchebags!”

I’m sorry, I know that this is hard to hear, but if all you can do is list a bunch of faults you don’t have, then back the fuck away..

..Don’t complain about how girls fall for jerks; they fall for those jerks because those jerks have other things they can offer. “But I’m a great listener!” Are you? Because you’re willing to sit quietly in exchange for the chance to be in the proximity of a pretty girl (and spend every second imagining how soft her skin must be)? Well guess what, there’s another guy in her life who also knows how to do that, and he can play the guitar. Saying that you’re a nice guy is like a restaurant whose only selling point is that the food doesn’t make you sick. You’re like a new movie whose title is This Movie Is in English, and its tagline is “The actors are clearly visible”.

David Wong, 6 Harsh Truths That Will Make You a Better Person

This never gets old. 

(via denasynesthesia)

'Jesy Nelson doesn't love her fans'

yeah,yeah keep talking.

“Of course, I wonder if they love me back, which is, really, besides the point. I don’t do it to be adored, I do it because my love keeps getting bigger and that’s what happens.”
— Richard Siken, ‘The Long and Short of It’ (via patrocius)
dellbelle39:

decided to try out black hermione and I think i’m in love

dellbelle39:

decided to try out black hermione and I think i’m in love

#hp
a Misunderstood White Dudes tag meta madlib

apsychosis:

#can we talk about this (noun) for a moment? because THIS (SAME NOUN). (white dude #1) has never been able to (transitive verb) his (plural noun). he’s (sad adjective); he’s (sadder adjective). he (verb)ed all his life and now (white dude #2) has (transitive verb)ed his (noun) and it’s like (incoherent mixed metaphor). look at the (noun) in his (body part). you can SEE the (noun) - you can see how much this (adjective) (noun) (verb)s his (noun). (white dude #2) is (white dude #1)’s (second mixed metaphor preferably alluding to shared dark past)! THEY (TRANSITIVE VERB) EACH OTHER SO MUCH #i just have a lot of feelings

Teachers are often unaware of the gender distribution of talk in their classrooms. They usually consider that they give equal amounts of attention to girls and boys, and it is only when they make a tape recording that they realize that boys are dominating the interactions. Dale Spender, an Australian feminist who has been a strong advocate of female rights in this area, noted that teachers who tried to restore the balance by deliberately ‘favouring’ the girls were astounded to find that despite their efforts they continued to devote more time to the boys in their classrooms. Another study reported that a male science teacher who managed to create an atmosphere in which girls and boys contributed more equally to discussion felt that he was devoting 90 per cent of his attention to the girls. And so did his male pupils. They complained vociferously that the girls were getting too much talking time.

In other public contexts, too, such as seminars and debates, when women and men are deliberately given an equal amount of the highly valued talking time, there is often a perception that they are getting more than their fair share. Dale Spender explains this as follows:

“The talkativeness of women has been gauged in comparison not with men but with silence. Women have not been judged on the grounds of whether they talk more than men, but of whether they talk more than silent women.”

In other words, if women talk at all, this may be perceived as ‘too much’ by men who expect them to provide a silent, decorative background in many social contexts.

PBS: Language as Prejudice - Myth #6: Women Talk Too Much (via misandry-mermaid)